Ruckus Logo

ABOVE: Glass Breakfast, Letitia Quesenberry


Glass Breakfast: Letitia Quesenberry


Q&A
Ian Carstens



Letitia Quesenberry uses color lenses, filters, shadow and light as a means of exploring vision’s ambiguities. Her artistic concerns involve the cultivation of an aesthetic inscrutability, a type of visual veiling to destabilize perception. Through drawing, painting, photography, installation and text she accentuates nuance, combining semitransparent materials like color correction film, resin, beeswax and sanded plexiglass with reflective or opaque materials like graphite, spray paint, plaster, mirrors, coal slag and mica dust. Through the play of materials, surfaces, and technologies, Quesenberry surveys the boundaries of visual perception, memory’s effect on present experience and how these relate to ideas of certainty. She received a BFA from the University of Cincinnati and lives in Louisville KY, where filmmaker Ian Carstens sat down with her in her studio.

-

Notes:

-

1.18.21

Ian Carstens uses the documentary, experimental, and curatorial modes to create both interiorly personal pieces as well as multidimensional collaborative projects. Carstens currently lives and works in Bloomington, IN.
An orange, thin-lined, and upside-down equilateral triangle is superimposed in the center of a black square, which is further superimposed on a white, shallow box, justified to the top slightly, that hangs on a white wall.
as of yet 96 (2020), panel, polished plaster, paint, glitter, film, resin. Image courtesy of the artist.


Many concentric rings and circles of varying colors like teal, blue, orange, pink and yellow, are centered and superimposed on top of each other, and are superimposed again in the center of a lavender square, which is then superimposed again––and justified slightly to the top––of a white, shallow box that hands on the wall.

anon 2 (2020), panel, plaster, paint, resin. Photo credit Matthew Peaver.


A large circular light box hangs on a white wall with a thick circular wood border that glows with concentric pink and orange hues.
BLSH 13 (2020), panel, lacquer, plexiglas, film, paint. Image courtesy of the artist.


An upside down equilateral triangle lightbox hangs on a white wall with a a thick white wooden border, that glows with green and blue hues.
hyperspace 35 (2019), panel, lacquer, plexiglas, film, resin, LED. Image courtesy of the artist.


A collection of 7 light boxes that glow brightly in a white wall in the dark, hung in a disordered way, and each glow with their own sets of colors, some green and blue, some purple and pink, and so on.
Installation of somewhere in the future I am remembering today at David Smith Gallery. Photo credit Matthew Peaver.